Unbeetable Sourdough Rye Bread

Total Time
12hrs 35mins
Prep 12 hrs
Cook 35 mins

This is variation of marbled rye. It does take some time to prepare; however, nothing beats the wonderful chewy texture of rye bread that has been slathered in melting butter. The recipe makes 2 tall and proud loaves of bread--one for you and one to share. The initial mixing of the breads can be done with a Kitchenaid Mixer and dough hooks. Words of Wisdom from the Creating Chef: Sourdough baking is not an exact science and if anyone tries to tell you so don't buy it. During the creation of this bread, I made it 3 times. Each time the sponge was different in some way. Either there was more one time than the other or less. Same amount of ingredients, same quantities produced different results. The sponge should be wet, not soupy. If it isn't add more water. If to wet add more flour. Next there is the issue of flour. That will vary as well so I listed the ingredients with an either or. Also, I learned that to produce a tall loaf of rye bread, loaf pans are a must. The free form loaf while good wasn't what I was wanting. Lastly will the beets bleed out without the food coloring? I have no idea after the third time around, I added in a small amount of red paste food coloring. This recipe is truly unbeetable. Created for RSC #14

Ingredients Nutrition

Directions

  1. The night before combine the ingredients for sponge, cover lightly with plastic wrap and allow to stand in a draft free place overnight. The sponge should have bubbled and have a pleasant sour odor.
  2. The next morning, stir down and divide the sponge. For the onion rye, warm the olive oil in a small pan and cook the green onions until wilted. Set aside and allow to cool.
  3. Proof the yeast in 1/2 cup warm water with sugar for 5 minutes or until bubbly. Add the proofed yeast to 1 portion of the sponge along with onions, butter, milk powder, cocoa, salt and rye flour; add the all-purpose flour 1/2 cup at a time until dough forms a ball and leaves sides of bowl. The dough will be lightly tacky but manageable with floured hands.
  4. Knead on a lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic. Place in a large bowl that has been lightly greased with olive oil, turning to coat, cover loosely with a damp cloth and allow to rise until double, approximately 1 hour.
  5. For bread 2, proof the yeast in 2 tablespoons warm water with sugar for 5 minutes or until bubbly. To puree the beets add them with reserved liquid to a food processor or blender and process until smooth.
  6. Add the proofed yeast to sponge along with beets, dill weed, dill seed, butter, milk powder, salt, food coloring and rye flour. Add the the all-purpose flour 1/2 cup at a time until dough forms ball and leaves the sides of the bowl. The dough will be lightly tacky but manageable with floured hands.
  7. Knead on a lightly floured surface until smooth and elastic. Place in a large bowl that has been lightly greased with olive oil, turning to coat, cover loosely with a damp cloth and allow to rise until double, approximately 1 hour.
  8. To make the bread, punch down each of the doughs and knead lightly. Divide each into 2 equal portions. There will be a total of 2 "onion" and 2 "beet".
  9. Shape each portion into a 10 inch rope. Using 1 of each color tightly braid ropes and when braided twist lightly. With dampened fingers, seal the dough where the colors join. Turn ends under and place in loaf pans that have been lightly oiled.
  10. Cover with towel and allow to rise until double. The second rise took about 45 minutes. Drizzle the tops of the loaves with olive oil and bake in preheated 375 degree oven for 35 to 40 minutes or until done. Tap the top of the loaf and if it sounds hallow it is baked through.
  11. Remove from pans and place on wire rack; allow to cool, slice and enjoy.
Most Helpful

5 5

I particularly appreciated the detailed instructions on how to make a sponge. This was very helpful to me as I played with sourdough. I used Sourdough Bread Starter by Bergy. The bread baked beautifully. I ended up with tall loaves with a beautiful dense texture and a chewy crust. We preferred the onion rye & I will make it again singly. The Beet Rye is pretty in color, tastes wonderful, but the two loaves together do take quite a bit of time. I used the bread to make Reuben Paninis! and it was simply excellent grilled. Good luck in the contest!